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Rawktumblr: Guide For Bands To Getting Written And Blogged About

rawkblog:

Are you a band or musician? Would you like someone, anyone, to write about your music? Here is some advice.

1) Who You Should Send It To:

You should start with blogs and online publications. What kind of music do you play? Look on Hypem.com to see what blogs have posted about bands who…

Some good DIY advice here, but I’m unclear why the following things aren’t listed:

  • "send your music to a label"
  • "send your music to a respected PR firm" 
  • "find out who manages _______ and then try hollering at that guy" (no one pays attention to band managers, but they’re so crucial). 
  • "email ________ and ask if they need an opener for their next tour?"

These are longer, pre-Web 2.0 shots of course, but as someone who’s worked as a critic and who spam-filters hundreds of band emails per week still, I’m much quicker to actually open emails or pay attention to bands aligned with established intermediaries and artists whose tastes and track records I respect. I know a lot of other critics (not mp3 bloggers, mind you) think exactly the same way. There are “blog band” examples aplenty, but why not shoot higher at the same time? I know of just as many if not more bands who’ve done these things as I have bands who’ve gone through the hype-churn. 

Also, sort of related to Dave’s #8 but more specific: don’t just “not suck,” but have a well-defined aesthetic that’s also sort of uber-current. This is how things work. It sounds superficial, but if you describe yourself as a “singer-songwriter” and you’re not the one-in-a-million thing that Bon Iver was, sorry pal.

Another idea: make a Spotify or Soundcloud DJ-style mix of your “influences,” do it well and make sure those influences are hip if not obscure, and not like “The Beatles but punk, lol.”

Another idea: don’t name yourself something fucking stupid or “controversy-baiting,” thinking it’ll separate you from the pack. There’s a 99.9% chance you’ll just end up on a publication’s year-end list of horrible band names. Bad attention is lame.

Also, as Mark says, tag your goddamn mp3s. That’s seriously the #1 way to make a critic hate you forever.

(via rawkblog-deactivated20131111)